Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education

supporting inclusion, challenging exclusion

news & events

Happy Birthday CSIE!

28 June 2020

Happy Birthday CSIE

On this day CSIE celebrates 38 years of remarkable achievements! Founded on 28 June 1982 as the Centre for Studies on Integration in Education, CSIE took on its current name in the 1990s. The Centre has continued to evolve, has expanded its remit to cover all aspects of equality in education, and has remained at the forefront of developments in inclusive education. Within the past year alone, CSIE has:

CSIE has recently averted the sudden danger of having to fold, largely thanks to the fundraising efforts of its director who ran more than 70 km as part of a “2.6 challenge”. The donations page is still open, for anyone who wants to make a gift, large or small.

Last but not least, a PATH event (Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope) has been planned for Tuesday 30 June, which many of CSIE’s friends and allies are expected to attend from as far afield as Europe, Brazil, India and Canada. This is offered as a gift to CSIE by Inclusive Solutions, who offer a wide range of online training on a range of topics, including on person-centred planning, and to whom we remain grateful for this gift.

Happy Birthday CSIE, we all wish that you keep going from strength to strength and continue to be valued for achievements at the cutting edge of educational change!

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New internship

08 June 2020

We are delighted to welcome Ruth Thornton to the CSIE team! Ruth has joined us as a Research and Project Assistant for a month-long internship funded by the University of Bristol. Ruth, an undergraduate student studying French and German, searched for a local education charity when she heard of the University’s COVID-19 Small and Medium Enterprises scheme. This program aims to help organizations such as CSIE through these difficult times by paying the salary of a student intern for a month. Passionate as she is about promoting equality, Ruth chose to support CSIE and begins her internship today, Monday 8 June.

Ruth will be supporting CSIE’s ongoing efforts in fundraising, as well as contributing to work on current projects. We hope that, with her help, we will be able to set up a “matching” service, to pair up experienced educators with time on their hands, with children and young people needing additional support to learn from home during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ruth is a most welcome addition to the team and we extend our most heartfelt thanks to her, for choosing to support our work, and to the University of Bristol, for making this possible.

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Covid-19 and CSIE

23 April 2020

The good news is that CSIE staff and trustees are well, safe, and staying as positive as possible. In one sense it is business as usual: staff are busy working from home on existing projects. The IMAS II “Knowledge Box” on Disabled Children’s Rights in Education is nearing completion and will soon be available to school assistants who want to pilot it. Our long-awaited online Equality Hub is also nearing completion and should be available on www.tes.com when usual working conditions are restored. And we are still glowing with delight, at the memory of the IMAS project being selected as a “success story” and the international interest in CSIE following the Zero Project Conference 2020.

But all is not well. Bookings to deliver workshops and to speak at a conference have been cancelled and, with schools still closed, an important source of income is not available to us. CSIE’s future now hangs in the balance and, unless we find a way to cover a shortfall of £2,500 per month until schools reopen, CSIE will have to close.

That said, there is still hope. CSIE has joined the 2.6 challenge, a nationwide initiative to support the charity sector, starting this Sunday, 26 April. The idea is that people choose a challenge linked to the number 2.6 or 26 (because 26 April would have been the London Marathon, which raises millions for charities every year) and either make a donation to their chosen charity or ask family, friends and colleagues to sponsor them and make a bigger donation to their chosen charity. The challenge could be anything: walk, run, wheelchair, swim or cycle 2.6 miles, have an online meeting with 26 people, shrug your shoulders 26 times, literally anything. The only rule is to observe Government guidelines on exercising and social distancing. There is more information, including a wide range of challenge ideas, at www.twopointsixchallenge.co.uk.

CSIE’s director Artemi Sakellariadis has made a video describing her challenge.

We are also inviting our supporters to set up a challenge of their own to support CSIE. To do this, you will need to:

  1. sign in or create an account with Virgin Money Giving;
  2. click on ‘Take on a personal challenge’ and enter your challenge;
  3. select ‘2.6 Challenge’ when asked if you are doing a particular event;
  4. search and select CSIE when prompted to choose your charity;
  5. click on ‘Create my page’.

Many thanks in anticipation of your support! With your help we can keep CSIE on the map and continue to promote equality in education: addressing prejudice and working towards equal opportunities for all, especially for disabled children and young people!



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IMAS project a success story

31 March 2020

Erasmus

We have been delighted to hear that our earlier project on IMproving ASsistance in Inclusive Educational Settings (IMAS) has been selected as a “success story” by a panel of experts from the Directorate-General for Education, Youth, Sport and Culture of the European Commission.

"Success stories" are finalised projects that have distinguished themselves by their impact, contribution to policy-making, innovative results and/or creative approach, and can be a source of inspiration for others.

The IMAS project took place in 2016-17 and was funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Commission (project number 2016-1-AT01-KA202-016778). It focused on the education of disabled children and young people in Europe, with the aim of establishing a common framework for scrutinising how assistance is organised in schools.

The project stemmed from the fact that the European Union and all member states have ratified the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and, therefore, the European educational systems have to become inclusive. All children and young people should be able to rely on professional staff to enable their learning and participation in school. For disabled children and young people, non-teaching staff (learning support assistants, teaching assistants or similar) play a vital role in enabling them to successfully engage in every aspect of compulsory and post compulsory education.

The IMAS project set an important first step to draw attention to assistance services at national and European level, on the understanding that these play an important role in developing a more inclusive education system consistent with the requirements of the UNCRPD. The project demonstrated that there are no clear and consistent frameworks for availability, quality and responsibilities of learning support assistants in schools and other educational settings. It also showed that in some regions of Europe the possibility of making assistance services routinely available to disabled children does not exist.

The project put forward a set of recommendations, which were intended to provide orientation for decision makers and assist them in further developing assistance services in their countries, in ways which are consistent with the requirements of the UNCRPD.

CSIE is currently involved in the follow-up project, IMAS II, a two-year project which was launched in October 2018 and is also funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Commission (project number 2018-1-AT01-KA202-039302). CSIE is one of nine project partners from six European countries, working to develop five web-based “Knowledge Boxes” for learning support assistants working with disabled children and young people.

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International interest in CSIE

03 March 2020

Zero project 2020

Four years after receiving an Innovative Practice Award for our equality toolkit for schools, CSIE was honoured to be invited back to the next Zero Project Conference on the theme of Education. CSIE’s director Dr Artemi Sakellariadis was invited to contribute to an international panel on inclusive education. Called the “Couch Session”, because panellists sit on easy chairs and have a discussion, rather than being on stage making formal presentations, this was an opportunity to discuss what we mean by inclusive education, what barriers there are to achieving it and how these barriers may be overcome.

Michael Fembek, Director and Chief Executive of the Zero Project, moderated the discussion and fellow panellists were Albert Brandstätter, General Secretary of Lebenshilfe, Austria, and Nafissa Baboo, Director of Inclusive Education, Light for the World, South Africa. We are delighted that this session attracted very positive feedback from the 800-or-so delegates and that CSIE’s contribution generated a strong interest in our work and invitations to work with colleagues in a number of countries including Spain, Jordan and Brazil.

The Zero Project is an international organisation working towards a world with zero barriers, with a particular focus on disabled people’s rights. The Zero Project Conference takes place every year at the United Nations offices in Vienna, with a 4-year cycle on the themes of: Independent Living, Education, Employment and Accessibility.

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Rise in exclusions for racism

14 Jan 2020

CSIE was honoured to be invited on to Voice of Islam, a national radio station, to discuss a recent rise in exclusions for racism in primary schools. CSIE’s director, Dr Artemi Sakellariadis, was interviewed on Voice of Islam’s Breakfast Show yesterday, Monday 13th January, along with Paul Kearns, Deputy Chief Executive of Show Racism the Red Card. The programme was responding to a recent BBC analysis revealing that, whilst the number of exclusions because of racism across all schools in England had decreased in the decade 2006/7-2017/8, the number of primary-school exclusions for racism had dramatically risen.

As well as sharing CSIE’s history and aims, Dr Sakellariadis answered questions on possible reasons behind this increase and on whether exclusions represent effective solutions to expressions of racism in schools. Yesterday’s breakfast show is now available online, CSIE’s director is interviewed from 1:26 onwards. We would like to thank the Voice of Islam for the invitation to speak on this programme, giving us a chance to share our work and our perspective with the radio station’s national audience.

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Intelligent Lives

29 November 2019

Intelligent Lives

Many thanks to all who came to yesterday’s free screening of Intelligent Lives, the latest film by award-winning filmmaker Dan Habib, and joined in the public discussion which followed. The event was organised by CSIE in collaboration with the BRIDGE research group at the University of the West of England (UWE) in Bristol, a most apt partnership for an event which involves the exchange of ideas.

Intelligent Lives tells the stories of three young adults with learning difficulties as they navigate school, college and the workplace. The film encourages viewers to explore their thinking about learning difficulties and hopes to transform the label from a life sentence of isolation into a life of possibility.

In the discussion which followed the screening there was much praise for the film, and how it brought issues to life extremely effectively. Viewers were captivated by the three young adults' stories and commented on these, as well as on more general issues such as the importance of role models and of attending to everyone's perspective, including parents of other children in school and professionals who offer well-intentioned advice without always acknowledging that they might be on a different personal philosophical standpoint to that of the child's family. The highlight of the evening was perhaps the moment when one viewer said that the event transformed them, and they would be leaving the auditorium a different person to the one they were when they came in.

The second screening of Intelligent Lives scheduled for Sheffield next week has had to be cancelled, for reasons beyond our control, and will be rescheduled for next year. We also look forward to organising more free screenings of the film, each followed by a public discussion, across the country.

We remain grateful to filmmaker Dan Habib and the Intelligent Lives Project for selecting CSIE to organise these events in the UK.

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IMAS II project update

30 October 2019

IMASII

CSIE continues to be involved in the IMAS II project (IMproving ASsistance in inclusive educational settings II). Last week project partners met in Varna, Bulgaria, on 21 and 22 October to discuss progress on the development of the five online Knowledge Boxes. This was followed by a training activity on 23-25 October, during which learning support assistants from all countries represented in this project (Austria, Bulgaria, Portugal, Slovakia and the UK) came together to hear about ongoing work on the Knowledge Boxes being created by project partners, and offer feedback which contributes to their further development. Ongoing work presented on this occasion involved the Knowledge Box on Physical & Sensory Impairments, and the Knowledge Box on Cognition & Learning.

The IMAS II project is a two-year project funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Union (2018-1-AT01-KA202-039302). The project was launched in October 2018 at the University of Graz, Austria, he of the lead partner. It seeks to support and strengthen the development of learning support assistants' competencies for inclusive practice, in ways which are consistent with the requirements of Article 24 (Education) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. CSIE is one of nine project partners from six European countries. For more information please see the project newsletter.

Erasmus

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Intelligent Lives

28 October 2019

Intelligent Lives

We are delighted to announce that this year CSIE will be marking UK Disability History Month with two free screenings of the film Intelligent Lives. This is the latest film by award-winning filmmaker Dan Habib. It tells the stories of three young adults with learning difficulties as they navigate school, college and the workplace. The film encourages viewers to explore their thinking about learning difficulties and hopes to transform the label from a life sentence of isolation into a life of possibility.

Each screening will be followed by a community discussion. What do we lose when intelligence is a number? What are the implications of having the label of “learning difficulties”? And can any attempt to measure intelligence predict a person's value, or their potential to contribute meaningfully to the world?

These free screenings and community discussions are a must for learning support assistants, teachers, senior leaders and school governors who care about equal opportunities for every child. The events are also relevant to students, researchers, academics, families and other members of the public.

These events are being organised by CSIE, in collaboration with a local partner for each event: the BRIDGE research group at the University of the West of England (UWE) in Bristol, and iHuman, the University of Sheffield, in Sheffield.

Do come do one of the free screenings and join the conversation:

Bristol:

Thursday 28 November, 6:00-8:00 pm

www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/intelligent-lives-film-screening-bristol-tickets-78326872785

Sheffield:

Wednesday 4 December, 6:00-8:00 pm

www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/intelligent-lives-film-screening-sheffield-tickets-79123623889

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Contrasting responses to diversity

30 July 2019

CSIE has been reporting, since the 1980s, school placement trends of all local authorities in England (i.e. the proportion of children sent by each local authority to separate special schools within or outside the local authority’s boundaries). This detailed level of analysis, ranking of all local authorities from the one with the lowest to the one with the highest proportion of children in special schools, is unique to CSIE.

Work on the latest issue in this series, covering the years 2014-17, has now been completed with the help of a grant from the British Academy, to whom we remain grateful. We have, once again, worked in collaboration with researchers at the University of Exeter: Professor Brahm Norwich, Dr Alison Black and Dr Yi Liu (who has since moved to the University of Bristol). Findings of this research were presented at an open seminar in London in April 2019.

For the first time in the history of the Trends series, we are making the latest information freely available online: a report written by Dr Alison Black and Professor Brahm Norwich, a summary leaflet and a web application developed by Dr Yi Liu which includes: a) an interactive map; b) detailed information on rates of segregation for each local authority; and c) lists of all local authorities arranged from the least to the most segregating for each of the years examined. A manual is also available to help users access the information on the web application.

By referring to rates of segregation, this research adopts terminology put forward by the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. In its General Comment no. 4, the Committee explains how segregation, integration and inclusion should be understood, given that Article 24 (Education) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities requires the development of an inclusive education system at all levels. Segregation, which is not mentioned in Article 24, is defined as the education of disabled students in separate settings, isolated from non-disabled students. Integration, the Committee says, is the process of placing disabled students in existing mainstream institutions and expecting them to adjust to the requirements of these institutions. Inclusion, on the other hand, is the process of “systemic reform” involving changes in content, methods, approaches, structures and strategies in education, so that all students can have an equitable and participatory learning experience.

As has always been the case in the Trends series, this research is merely descriptive: it gives information on the proportion of pupils placed in different types of settings, without commenting on pupils’ experiences or attempting to explain the trends observed, both of which are beyond the remit of this research.

This research shows that there has been a rising national trend of special school placements over the last 10 years. Like other Trends reports before it, it also suggests a postcode lottery for inclusive education: there continues to be huge variation in the rates of segregation into special schools of children with Education and Health Care Plans. Some local authorities consistently rely more on mainstream settings, while others regularly send high proportions of children to special schools. In 2017 the proportion of children sent to special schools ranged from 0.18% (the equivalent of 1 child in every 552) in the London Borough of Newham, to 1.75% (the equivalent of 1 child in every 57) in Torbay. That is close to a tenfold difference! While there are small variations from year to year, these patterns remain relatively constant: most local authorities send to special schools roughly the same proportion of pupils from year to year.

Such significant differences between local authorities cannot easily be explained by the size or type of a local authority or by its social or geographical characteristics. Further research is needed in order to understand these diverse patterns.

Despite every local authority being subject to the same national policies and legislation, CSIE Trends reports keep bringing to light disturbing local variations. The significance of this research is twofold: up-to-date information can empower parents to make better informed choices for their children’s education, and it can help parents, professionals and others to lobby for change. Previous reports in the Trends series are available from CSIE.

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Happy Birthday CSIE!

28 June 2019

On this day CSIE celebrates 37 years of remarkable achievements! Founded on 28 June 1982 as the Centre for Studies on Integration in Education, CSIE took on its current name in the 1990s. The Centre has continued to evolve, has expanded its remit to cover all aspects of equality in education, and has remained at the forefront of developments in inclusive education. Within the past year alone, CSIE has:

Happy Birthday CSIE, we all wish that you keep going from strength to strength and continue to be valued for achievements at the cutting edge of educational change!

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Widening participation for disabled students

20 June 2019

The report is now available from a small-scale study commissioned by the Widening Participation Research Group of the University of Bristol. The study set out to understand disabled students’ experiences of studying at the University of Bristol, to shed light on any barriers to disabled students’ presence, learning and participation at the University, and to put forward recommendations for developing a more inclusive environment.

The research was carried out by CSIE’s director Artemi Sakellariadis, in collaboration with Dr Dave Bainton, Research Fellow at the University of Bristol. The study adopted the definition of disability as this appears in the Equality Act 2010 and, therefore, sought to engage with students who identify as disabled according to this definition: those who have a physical or mental impairment, including mental health issues, which has a substantial and long-term negative effect on their ability to carry out ordinary daily activities.

The study adopted a qualitative research approach. In the summer of 2017 students were first invited to share their experiences through an online survey (22 participants) and later discuss these in greater detail during narrative interviews (12 participants) which continued into the autumn of that year. Participants came from a range of faculties, were engaged in undergraduate and postgraduate studies, included mature students and had a range of impairments. The report suggests that the sample may be relatively small, but the lived experience of these students is very real and worthy of rapt attention.

The report foregrounds the voice of students and represents their experiences with regard to: support for their studies; support for personal needs related to their impairments; their understanding of barriers to inclusion; and the impact all this has had on their studies. Reflecting on these students’ experiences, and attempting to open up possibilities for reconceptualising support for disabled students and improve student experience and outcomes, the report suggests three broad areas for consideration: seeing the whole person, creating parity of experience and engaging in transformative problem-solving.

The University of Bristol is consistently ranked among the top ten UK Universities for its overall teaching and research output. By attending to the above areas, the report suggests, the University will be better placed to offer greater equality of opportunity for disabled students in the future. It should also be further enabled to operate in line with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010 and of Article 24 (Education) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

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IMAS II Project update

17 May 2019

Erasmuse IMASII

CSIE’s contribution to the IMAS II project (IMproving ASsistance in inclusive educational settings II), took us to Portugal last week. Project partners met in Coimbra on 6 and 7 May to discuss progress on the development of five online “knowledge boxes”. We then moved to picturesque Lousã, home of project partner ARCIL and were joined by learning supporters from Austria, Bulgaria, Portugal, Slovakia and the UK (all participating countries in this project). For the next three days we immersed ourselves in the content of the knowledge boxes on behaviour and on communication, visited a local school and shared our collective reflections on the whole event.

The IMAS II project is a two-year project funded by the Erasmus+ programme of the European Union (2018-1-AT01-KA202-039302). The project was launched in October 2018 at the University of Graz, Austria, home of the lead partner. It seeks to support and strengthen the development of learning support assistants' competencies for inclusive practice, in ways which are consistent with the requirements of Article 24 (Education) of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. CSIE is one of nine project partners from six European countries. For more information please see the project newsletter.

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Redefining ‘quality of education’

05 April 2019

The Office for Standards in Education (Ofsted) has had an open consultation, inviting feedback on its proposed new inspection framework “Education inspection framework 2019: inspecting the substance of education”, which is expected to be introduced in September.

In its response, CSIE welcomed the proposal to introduce a ‘quality of education’ judgement, seeing this as a more inclusive approach, shifting the emphasis away from performance outcomes. It added that this could be more closely aligned with the statutory duty which schools have, under the Equality Act 2010, to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to respond to the needs of disabled pupils. As this is an anticipatory duty, CSIE suggested that any evaluation of the quality of education should include an evaluation of the school’s readiness to respond to the needs of existing and prospective disabled pupils, as is the legal requirement. CSIE also asked for greater clarity on the criteria which inspectors will use to make judgements on the quality and implementation of Education and Health Care Plans, particularly for children and young people who have low incidence needs.

CSIE also suggested that the new inspection framework should be more closely aligned with key themes from the Code of Practice, such as the concepts of person-centred planning, empowerment and preparing for adulthood, to help ensure that schools are encouraged and supported in its implementation.

With regard to the Equality, diversity and inclusion statement which formed part of the same consultation, CSIE’s response welcomed the existence of this document and its clear emphasis on the public sector equality duty. At the same time CSIE expressed concern at the apparent hierarchy of protected characteristics and the implication that some should be given priority over others, as there is no such hierarchy suggested in the Equality Act. At a time when homophobic, biphobic and transphobic bullying continue to be rife in schools, the protected characteristics of sexual orientation and gender reassignment are just as important as those listed as more relevant to schools.

Last but not least, in its response CSIE suggested that the new framework offers an excellent opportunity to reinstate the limiting judgement according to which a school cannot be judged to be outstanding unless it can evidence its work to promote disability equality and increase its capacity to respond to the needs of disabled children and young people. This would be in line with the Government’s declaration of 2009, made in the process of ratifying the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, which states that the UK Government is committed to “continuing to develop an inclusive system where parents of disabled children have increasing access to mainstream schools and staff, which have the capacity to meet the needs of disabled children”.

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Royal Thanks

03 April 2019

Royal Invite Windsor Castle

CSIE’s director Artemi Sakellariadis attended a Reception at Windsor Castle yesterday, 2 April, celebrating 100 years of the National Council for Voluntary Organisations (NCVO). 200 charities were invited to attend, from a total of 14,000 NCVO members, ensuring a balanced representation of charities of different size, location and objectives. The Queen and members of The Royal Family were present at the event and spoke to guests. We are not permitted to share on our website photographs from the event itself, but were proud and honoured to hear that The Queen said to Artemi “Thank you for what you do”.

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Postcode lottery for inclusion?

12 March 2019

CSIE has been working with researchers at the University of Exeter to explore school placement trends (i.e. the proportion of children placed in special schools or other separate settings) of all local authorities in England. CSIE has been reporting local authority school placement trends since 1988. Work towards this latest report has been funded by the British Academy, to whom we remain grateful.

This report provides up-to-date information for the years 2014-17. It shows that there has been a rising national trend of special school placements over the last 10 years. Like other Trends reports before it, it also suggests a postcode lottery for inclusive education: there continues to be huge variation in the rates of inclusion into mainstream schools of children with Education and Health Care Plans. Some local authorities consistently rely more on mainstream settings, while others regularly send high proportions of children to special schools. In 2017 the proportion of children sent to special schools ranged from 0.18% (the equivalent of 1 child in every 556) in the London Borough of Newham, to 1.75% (the equivalent of 1 child in every 57) in Torbay. That is close to a tenfold difference! While there are small variations from year to year, these patterns persist in a way which renders the most inclusive and least inclusive local authorities consistently so.

Such significant differences bear no simple relation to the size of a local authority or its social or geographical characteristics. Further research is needed in order to understand such diverse patterns.

This latest report will be presented at an open seminar in London on Wednesday 10 April. The event is free but places are limited and must be booked in advance. For further information and to book your place please visit the eventbrite website.

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Support for supporters

28 October 2018

IMAS II

Following the success of the IMAS project on IMproving ASsistance in inclusive educational settings, a follow-up project IMAS II (2018-1-AT01-KA202-039302) has also secured funding from the Erasmus+ Programme of the European Union.

The new project was launched at the end of last week at the University of Graz, Austria, home of the lead partner, and is due to run for two years. CSIE was among eight more project partners from six European countries that were represented at the launch meeting.

Building on the recommendations of the first IMAS project, IMAS II aims to support and strengthen the development of learning support assistants' competencies for inclusive practice.

Collectively, the partners will develop five online “knowledge boxes” and further explore how best to support those who support the learning and development of disabled pupils in schools, in ways which are consistent with the requirements of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). For more information please see the press release.

Nearly 20 years on from CSIE’s national conferences in London and Manchester focusing on the role of learning supporters in inclusion, we are delighted to be part of this project and look forward to making a positive contribution to the way pupil support is organised in schools.

EU Funded

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Black History Month offer

01 October 2018

This October marks 30 years of Black History Month UK, an opportunity to acknowledge and celebrate people and events paving the way for race equality. This is not to say that Black History is different, or separate, from our shared history taught in schools, or that it should only be acknowledged in October. Far from it, Black History Month offers dedicated time to highlight and celebrate Black History as an integral part of our shared history. It also serves as an annual reminder to take a careful look at everything that goes on in schools (from curriculum and lesson plans to resources, displays, events and more) and make sure that Black History is honoured and Great Black British Achievers are celebrated throughout the year.

With this in mind, CSIE has teamed up with Black History Month UK to offer two great resources at one discounted price. During October, take advantage of our combined offer and get the Black History Month Schools Resource Pack and CSIE’s toolkit Equality: Making It Happen together, saving over £10. The Black History Month Schools Resource Pack contains posters, assembly notes, lesson plans for key stages 1, 2 and 3 and more. Equality: Making It Happen includes equality audit tools, key information, practical advice, examples of good practice with regard to all equality strands, and more. Get both resources for only £60 and be well on the way to promoting equality in your school. For more information and to place your order please visit our resources pages.

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Happy Birthday CSIE!

28 June 2018

On this day CSIE celebrates 36 years of remarkable achievements! Founded on 28 June 1982 as the Centre for Studies on Integration in Education, CSIE took on its current name in the 1990s. The Centre has continued to evolve, has expanded its remit to cover all aspects of equality in education, and has remained at the forefront of developments in inclusive education. On its 36th birthday, CSIE has many reasons to celebrate:

Our award-winning equality guide for schools continues to attract positive feedback, including an independent review in the March issue of Nasen’s magazine Connect, where the reviewer concluded that "Equality: Making It Happen" is “an extremely accessible and valuable resource for any educational provider” which “should be on every school's bookshelf”!

We have recently received a National Lottery grant to set up, in collaboration with primary and secondary schools, an online equality hub to be made freely available to all schools. Many teachers have told us that the multitude of resources available is overwhelming and that a single space from which to navigate through available resources would be extremely helpful. In the words of one head teacher: “The idea of an online equality hub being freely available to all schools is essential. When these issues arise for different schools, they don’t know where to look. To have something central, quickly and easily accessible, is brilliant.”

Earlier this year we completed our research on experiences of disabled students at the University of Bristol and expect to launch the report soon. Funding permitting, we are ready to begin work, in collaboration with researchers at the University of Exeter, on the next issue in the series of Trends reports, exploring the proportion of children placed in special schools or other separate settings by each local authority in England.

During the past year we saw the successful conclusion of three international projects we had been involved in: the European Literacy and Citizenship project (ELICIT-plus), the Improving Assistance in Inclusive Educational Settings project (IMAS) and the Beit project. We are honoured to have been invited to contribute to four new projects: a national research project on children’s experiences of inclusion and three international projects: a follow-up on the IMAS project, a new Erasmus+ project on Enhancing Practices of Inclusive Teaching in European Countries (EPITEC) and a new project creating a Sustainable Transformation on Educational Practices Initiative Network (STEP-IN).

Additional ways in which CSIE offers support for schools continue to be taken up by schools and local authorities throughout the country. We recently started offering support to schools carrying out an equality audit and have continued delivering equality workshops for staff and governors or for school leaders; equality workshops have recently been delivered in Brighton, Derby and Preston, attracting extremely positive feedback in each location. Our disability awareness workshops for pupils are becoming increasingly popular with primary and secondary schools; in two days of workshops at Eastlea Community School last month, 94% of pupils said on anonymous feedback slips that they have found the workshop helpful. Some of the reasons pupils gave were:

“It showed us how we are all similar and it does not matter if we look different.”

“It taught me that if you see a disabled person alone help and play with them.”

“There is an autistic person who keeps chasing me and now I know I shouldn’t run away from him.”

“I know more about disability and not to judge people.”

Happy Birthday CSIE, we all wish that you keep going from strength to strength and continue to be valued for achievements at the cutting edge of educational change!

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SEND Inquiry

15 June 2018

CSIE has responded to the Education Committee’s inquiry into special educational needs and disabilities. In its response, CSIE provided details of the multiple agencies which have recently emphasised the need to develop a more inclusive education system, including the Equality and Human Rights Commission, the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child and the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. CSIE also emphasised that recent law reforms do not fully embrace other relevant legislation, including the Equality Act 2010. Finally, CSIE’s submission referred to ongoing barriers to equality of opportunity: a) the chicken-and-egg relationship between parental choice and the context in which it takes place stressing that, until schools in every part of the country are willing and able to include the full diversity of learners, the promise of parental choice remains hollow; and b) inflexible ideas about how teaching and learning are organised in schools, leading to widespread belief that some disabled children cannot be included in ordinary schools.

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Clearance sale

12 June 2018

In a once-in-a-lifetime sale, we are offering up to 90% off our resources, for a limited period only and while stocks last. We are preparing to relocate our stockroom and need to reduce our stock of printed resources. During June only, we are selling off all our current resources for £5 or £10 each, and most titles in our bargain corner for an unbelievable £1 each!

Whether you are looking for a whole school equality guide, the Index for Inclusion for early years or information on local authority school placement trends, there has never been a better time to get great resources at fantastic discounts!

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Awards for All

05 June 2018

We are delighted to announce that CSIE has received funding from the National Lottery Awards for All programme to set up an online equality hub! The grant will enable us to work with schools to create this new resource, and make it freely available to all schools.

We expect to draw from our collaboratively-created, award-winning guide "Equality: Making It Happen – a guide to help schools ensure everyone is safe, included and learning” enhanced with up-to-date information and enriched with current examples of good practice. Teachers tell us that the multitude of resources available is overwhelming and agree that a single space from which to navigate through available resources would be extremely helpful. In the words of one head teacher: “The idea of an online equality hub being freely available to all schools is essential. When these issues arise for different schools, they don’t know where to look. To have something central, quickly and easily accessible, is brilliant!”

We are exploring the possibility that the new equality hub will be hosted on a long-established website popular with teachers, and trust we will soon be able to confirm further details about this exciting project.

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Beit project update

16 March 2018

CSIE is proud to have been the UK partner for the Beit Project since 2016 and to have contributed to recent talks about the continuation of the project.

The Beit Project Association was created in 2010 by an interdisciplinary group dedicated to citizenship education and heritage. It seeks to transform heritage sites into educational platforms for dialogue and debate linking History and contemporary issues. The project’s focus is on encountering the city, the people who live there, the buildings, the history, and the issues these raise which are still relevant today. ‘Encountering the other’, is made possible through the various stages of the project.

In 2016-2018, the project has been co-funded by the European Union in the frame of the Europe for Citizens programme of the Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency. It has been realized in 8 cities (London, Lodz, Paris, Brussels, Barcelona, Marseille, Sofia and Skopje) of 7 European countries (United-Kingdom, Poland, France, Belgium, Spain, Bulgaria and Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia) with the support of the local partners (Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education, Centrum Dialogu, Maison de l’Europe à Paris, Archives de la Ville de Bruxelles, Shalom and Euro Baljan Institute) and the energy of the local teams. Thanks to them, more than 3000 European citizens have been touched by the project during this period. More information is available on the Beit Project website; an English translation will be added here as soon as it becomes available.

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Praise for our equality guide

07 March 2018

Nasen Review

CSIE is delighted to hear that our award-winning guide Equality: Making It Happen – A guide to help schools ensure everyone is safe, included and learning, is reviewed in the March issue of nasen Connect. This time the independent reviewer is Ruth Harlow, Primary School Inclusion Leader, who has written a true accolade for our resource, praising its versatility and user-friendliness among other things. Her review opens by saying that “‘Equality: Making It Happen’ is an extremely accessible and valuable resource for any educational provider”, and closes by suggesting that it “should be on every school’s bookshelf”. At £30 a copy if bought directly from CSIE, we certainly hope that schools will choose to take up her recommendation!

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New strategic partnership

07 March 2018

CSIE is honoured to have been invited to become a strategic partner of the Essex & Thames Primary SCITT and looks forward to a long and constructive collaboration. This partnership arises out of an increasingly strong association between the two organisations and CSIE’s long-standing involvement in school-centred initial teacher education in Essex, including a keynote address in the Essex Inclusion Conference of two years ago. The partnership opens up exciting possibilities and CSIE looks forward to sharing its expertise and existing resources, or collaboratively creating new tailor-made resources, in the coming weeks, months and years.

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Free Workshops

16 February 2018

CSIE is delighted to have been awarded a grant from the Goodall Foundation to support our work promoting equality in schools in Brighton & Hove. We are planning, in close collaboration with Brighton & Hove City Council, to run two equality workshops next month. The workshops will be of interest to senior leaders of primary and secondary schools, will address key issues of equality in education and provide simple and practical ideas to help schools raise achievement, address prejudice and reduce bullying through attending to equality holistically. For more information and to book through the Council’s online portal please see www.beem.org.uk/Event/65349 for the morning workshop (11:30-1:30 on 20 March) and www.beem.org.uk/Event/66413 for the twilight session (4:00-6:00 pm on 20 March).

We remain grateful to the Goodall Foundation and Brighton & Hove City Council for their financial and practical support respectively, to enable these equality workshops to go ahead and to be offered to participants free of charge. The workshops are framed around our award-winning guide Equality: Making It Happen of which all participants will receive a complimentary copy.

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Snapshots of equality

05 February 2018

During LGBT History Month, we are available to carry out equality surveys in primary and secondary schools, providing each school with clear information and practical recommendations.

Based on questionnaires from our award-winning guide “Equality: Making It Happen”, this is a rare opportunity to engage the whole school community and address all protected characteristics covered by the Equality Act 2010.

Here is what you can expect from us. We will:

Special offer for orders placed by 28 February 2018: £500 +vat

To place an order, please complete this online order form.

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Page last updated: Saturday 04 July 2020

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